Empathy Over Sympathy: How we react to the suffering of others.

I attended a lecture during my third year of medical school as a part of a joint OB/GYN and Pediatric Grand Rounds on helping mothers through fetal loss. The lecturer asked the audience whether they felt empathy or sympathy, as the healthcare provider in difficult situations such as these. Hands creeped up hesitantly, clearly unsure

How to cultivate wellness WITHIN the workplace (not just outside of it).

It’s no secret that I’m a fierce advocate for the importance of self care (check out my feature in the recent edition of EVMS magazine highlighting the necessary wellness-focused culture shift in American medical training below). Some of the issues I’m most passionate about within the medical field are humanism in medicine, burnout, the power

A privileged heterosexual middle-class skinny white woman’s honest un-polished real-time experience of inclusivity training – Part One.

I’m doing an “inclusivity training for yoga” right now, because Bhav Brigade is a nonprofit yoga platform built on the tenets of accessibility and inclusivity and as it’s co-founder (one that happens to be all the things we tend to welcome in with open arms as a society) it’s important that I walk the talk.

My doctor’s love is important to me, but he does not know.

“My doctor’s love is as important to me as his chemotherapy, but he does not know.” I read this sentence and tears roll down my cheeks. I am alone on a hilltop somewhere without a name in New Zealand and the sun is out and everything is idyllic but I am weeping. This sentence hits

I am safe. I am lovable. I am enough.

It’s been said by Cognitive Behavioral Therapists (CBT) that the dysfunction we experience in life can generally be traced back to three core limiting beliefs: 1. I am unsafe (I am helpless, a victim, likely to be hurt, etc.) 2. I am unlovable (I am unwanted, bad, undesirable, likely to be rejected or abandoned, etc.)

Can we all just agree there’s no monopoly on suffering?

It’s become a pissing contest, particularly in American society, of who’s suffered more, of who’s endured the most trauma and lived to tell the tale. How often do we feel the spoken and unspoken question asked, “Who are you to suffer–who are you to cry trauma or claim hardship–when there’s x y and z happening

Solo Travel: The Antidote for Codependence

Solo travel is, at it’s core, selfish. Not in a negative way, just in an it-is-what-it-is kind of way. If that’s too hard a semantics pill for you to swallow then feel free to use the term self-oriented–it’s all the same to me. I’m living in a sustainable community on the Coromandel peninsula at the moment–my second

A Meditation for Remembering

Find a comfortable supported place to sit where the light falls softly (if it doesn’t, light a candle). Let the spine grow long, reaching the crown of the head towards the sky. Pick your shoulders up to your ears and then relax them down and away. Blink the eyes closed gently and settle in. Now, start to

Waking Up Through Heart Break.

I’ve never seen any transformation in my life that didn’t begin with someone getting tired of their own bullshit.” – Liz Gilbert Once upon a time I gave my heart to a man. And I gave it to a woman, my best friend. And actually I gave my heart to just about anyone who needed