Grasping Aparigraha

“Throughout college and my years in the army, I practiced racquetball in much of the same way I would later practice yoga: I made a study of it. Toward the end of this time I was watching two advanced players. The younger one was rushing about. The older one seemed to play with very little

My doctor’s love is important to me, but he does not know.

“My doctor’s love is as important to me as his chemotherapy, but he does not know.” I read this sentence and tears roll down my cheeks. I am alone on a hilltop somewhere without a name in New Zealand and the sun is out and everything is idyllic but I am weeping. This sentence hits

I am safe. I am lovable. I am enough.

It’s been said by Cognitive Behavioral Therapists (CBT) that the dysfunction we experience in life can generally be traced back to three core limiting beliefs: 1. I am unsafe (I am helpless, a victim, likely to be hurt, etc.) 2. I am unlovable (I am unwanted, bad, undesirable, likely to be rejected or abandoned, etc.)

Can we all just agree there’s no monopoly on suffering?

It’s become a pissing contest, particularly in American society, of who’s suffered more, of who’s endured the most trauma and lived to tell the tale. How often do we feel the spoken and unspoken question asked, “Who are you to suffer–who are you to cry trauma or claim hardship–when there’s x y and z happening

Lotus Flowers & Shit Days.

I woke up today with a sharp pain beneath my left shoulder blade, so intense it takes my breath away. I know this pain well–it’s been visiting from time to time since I was 20–residual from a bad car accident years ago. I breathe through the spasms and continue about my morning, stopping first at

The Love Languages of Giving and Receiving.

My love language for giving is speech. My heart most naturally flows from my body in the form of words and the way it shows up in the world tangibly is through writing and in yoga. When I teach yoga I speak rather than show–I prefer verbal adjustments over physical (largely out of practicality because

The underrated simple joys of living.

“We should all do what, in the long run, gives us joy, even if it is only picking grapes or sorting the laundry.”  – E.B. White A handful of simple tasks that I would normally complain about back home, but I’ve found during my time here in Coromandel to bring inexplicable joy: Hanging freshly washed laundry